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Thread: Jim Kelly Has Mouth Cancer - Post Messages Here

  1. #81
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    Buffalo Bills

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    When I was a kid I mailed Jim a letter with his football card. Weeks later a quick note back with a signed football card arrived. Jim Kelly to me is the Buffalo Bills. I love this guy and what he did for our football team. For me, hearing has cancer is like hearing of a family members having cancer. He's been through enough with losing his son, I hope and pray he has a quick recovery.
    What would you be doing if nothing were impossible...

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    Holy crap people!!! I simply asked if he was a dipper. I did not assign judgment or blame. I love Jim just like everyone else. So please GET OVER YOURSELVES with all the high and mighty how dare you talk. I appreciate there are loads of unknowns. I get that it is complicated but I figured I am allowed to ask the question.

    If I wasn't a Bills fan I probably wouldn't be here. Take it down a notch.

    I guess I should have added I am pulling for him and wish him the best
    ..............

  3. #83
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    Best wishes, Jim. Thinking of you and praying for your family.

    I'm sure you'll fight your way through this one; how could it be any other way for a QB with a linebacker's mentality?

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    Quote Originally Posted by blitzboy54 View Post
    Holy crap people!!! I simply asked if he was a dipper. I did not assign judgment or blame. I love Jim just like everyone else. So please GET OVER YOURSELVES with all the high and might how dare you talk. I appreciate there are loads of unknowns. I get that it is complicated but I figured I am allowed to ask the question.

    If I wasn't a Bills fan I probably wouldn't be here. Take it down a notch.
    It's a natural human response for people to ask the "WHY" question, so I agree with you. No one asks that question more than the patient themselves and their direct family members. When cancer happens, the FIRST thing we all want to know is the "WHY".

    There is also a desperate need for education regarding this type of disease, so IMO your question was a good one, and certainly didn't come across as judgmental as much as a normal human response to a diagnosis of cancer.

    2014 Adopt-A-Bill: Da'Norris Searcy

    Thanks to -realfan- for the beautiful tribute:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wquq4DTbC9E

    Twitter @wyobilzfan



  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyo View Post
    I stated that in my first post here. Indeed, this is a serious problem and the increasing number of younger people (early 50's and younger) developing this disease have demonstrated a clear link to the HPV virus.

    What most people don't realize is that upwards 90% of the 18-45 year old population carries the HPV virus. It is by far the most common STI (sexually transmitted infection) and most don't know they are carrying it. I don't have the stats handy for the older population, but my gut feeling is that older adults carry the infection at almost the same rate. That is why they are pushing for BOTH males and females to be vaccinated against HPV before becoming sexually active.
    A friend of mine works for the CDC and stated that pretty much everyone has this disease. It's as common as the cold virus but the difference like you said is that the large majority doesn't know they have it.

    My GF got the vaccination about 5 years ago and stories like Michael Douglas make me glad she did.
    SIGNATURE
    Quote Originally Posted by muffman View Post
    Arent you the guy who said the Bills drafted EJ Manuel so they could "sell him in the americas, africa and the middle east?"
    LMAO....
    Quote Originally Posted by TAPITSB View Post
    No I said if he becomes a star he has more international AD ability than Tom Brady. I was talking about how the black athlete is marketed internationally.
    Quote Originally Posted by TAPITSB View Post
    Brady isn't Manuel and as stated the media tends to take a man like Manuel because they can sell him in all of the America's and Africa and the Middle East and not just in the United States.

  6. #86
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    You can beat this Jim with God, prayer, and good medical treatment.

    You can count on plenty of prayer from the area and beyond.

    God Bless.

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    Kelly is one of a kind. This guy does not know the meaning of 'quit'. He is going to fight this and come out of it just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatSheSaid View Post
    A friend of mine works for the CDC and stated that pretty much everyone has this disease. It's as common as the cold virus but the difference like you said is that the large majority doesn't know they have it.

    My GF got the vaccination about 5 years ago and stories like Michael Douglas make me glad she did.
    QFT. This is the most poorly understood health problem by the general population IMO. Not enough education about HPV exists, and one MUST assume that a person IS carrying the HPV virus than not. It's beyond an epidemic, it's as you stated... as common as anyone carrying the viruses that cause the common cold. Problem with HPV is that it is insidious, and most refuse to believe or be tested for the disease because they are in denial.

    In this case, ignorance is NOT bliss.
    2014 Adopt-A-Bill: Da'Norris Searcy

    Thanks to -realfan- for the beautiful tribute:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wquq4DTbC9E

    Twitter @wyobilzfan



  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyo View Post
    QFT. This is the most poorly understood health problem by the general population IMO. Not enough education about HPV exists, and one MUST assume that a person IS carrying the HPV virus than not. It's beyond an epidemic, it's as you stated... as common as anyone carrying the viruses that cause the common cold. Problem with HPV is that it is insidious, and most refuse to believe or be tested for the disease because they are in denial.

    In this case, ignorance is NOT bliss.
    From my understanding, there isn't a test for males and the only way they know they have it is if they do break out with a wart or warts...which is only about 1%.

    Females must keep regular visits to the OBGYN and they should be okay...correct? I believe 99% of the people have their immune system fight this virus and it will pass between 6-24 months. Am I correct with that?
    SIGNATURE
    Quote Originally Posted by muffman View Post
    Arent you the guy who said the Bills drafted EJ Manuel so they could "sell him in the americas, africa and the middle east?"
    LMAO....
    Quote Originally Posted by TAPITSB View Post
    No I said if he becomes a star he has more international AD ability than Tom Brady. I was talking about how the black athlete is marketed internationally.
    Quote Originally Posted by TAPITSB View Post
    Brady isn't Manuel and as stated the media tends to take a man like Manuel because they can sell him in all of the America's and Africa and the Middle East and not just in the United States.

  10. #90
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    My first thought was "wow, that sounds serious" and anytime you see the 'C" word next to the someone's name you tend to think of it in terms of the worst case scenario. From what I can gather the survival rate for this form of cancer, which is said to be the second most common type of skin cancer, is upwards of 95%. That's great news when you consider the reality that a ridiculously high percentage of people either don't properly take care of themselves (in consultation with a physician) or don't have the resources to do so. Given Jim's recent neck, back and hernia issues obviously he has been under a physicians care and I would imagine this was caught earlier than later just based on the fact he's been so active treating his other health issues. I'd imagine his chance of survival is probably much greater than 95% given the resources at his disposal as well. I'm imaging a positive outcome for Jim Kelly.

    As far as possible tobacco use or HPV, it's probably not worth speculating on the exact cause of Jim's condition but it's definitely worth educating yourself on the potential dangers that are out there. Tobacco use and STD's can lead to serious health complications and anything you can do to mitigate those risks is worth exploring. Still, people are going to continue to smoke, dip and have sex with Pamela Anderson even where they reasonably understand the risks. It's crazy but that's just people being people.
    Note to Russ Brandon: Potential sells tickets in September and October, winning sells tickets in November and December.

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cribbs20 View Post
    My first thought was "wow, that sounds serious" and anytime you see the 'C" word next to the someone's name you tend to think of it in terms of the worst case scenario. From what I can gather the survival rate for this form of cancer, which is said to be the second most common type of skin cancer, is upwards of 95%. That's great news when you consider the reality that a ridiculously high percentage of people either don't properly take care of themselves (in consultation with a physician) or don't have the resources to do so. Given Jim's recent neck, back and hernia issues obviously he has been under a physicians care and I would imagine this was caught earlier than later just based on the fact he's been so active treating his other health issues. I'd imagine his chance of survival is probably much greater than 95% given the resources at his disposal as well. I'm imaging a positive outcome for Jim Kelly.

    As far as possible tobacco use or HPV, it's probably not worth speculating on the exact cause of Jim's condition but it's definitely worth educating yourself on the potential dangers that are out there. Tobacco use and STD's can lead to serious health complications and anything you can do to mitigate those risks is worth exploring. Still, people are going to continue to smoke, dip and have sex with Pamela Anderson even where they reasonably understand the risks. It's crazy but that's just people being people.
    This is not "skin cancer" (which is typically called basal cell carcinoma or melanoma depending on cell type). It is SQUAMOUS cell cancer and the origins of this are from mucosal tissue or the lining of certain organ systems like the bronchial tubes in the lungs. SQUAMOUS cell cancers are usually NOT that easy to treat compared to the "garden variety" basal cell cancer of the skin.
    2014 Adopt-A-Bill: Da'Norris Searcy

    Thanks to -realfan- for the beautiful tribute:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wquq4DTbC9E

    Twitter @wyobilzfan



  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatSheSaid View Post
    From my understanding, there isn't a test for males and the only way they know they have it is if they do break out with a wart or warts...which is only about 1%.

    Females must keep regular visits to the OBGYN and they should be okay...correct? I believe 99% of the people have their immune system fight this virus and it will pass between 6-24 months. Am I correct with that?
    http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/genital_warts/hic_understanding_hpv.aspx

    Understanding Cervical HPV


    Share on email Share on print

    What is cervical cancer?

    Cervical cancer is a condition in which the cells in the lining of the cervix — the narrow, outer end of the uterus — change and grow very fast, producing a mass of cells called a tumor. This condition usually develops over time. It can affect women of any age, but it is most common in women in their mid-40s. A type of virus, called HPV, is the cause of most cases of cervical cancer.
    What is HPV?

    HPV stands for human papilloma virus. It is a very common virus. There are about 100 types of HPV that affect different parts of the body. About 30 types of HPV can affect the genitals — including the vulva, ***ina, cervix, penis, and scrotum — as well as the rectum and anus. Of those, about 13 types are considered "high risk," for leading to cervical cancer.
    How common is HPV?

    HPV that affects the genitals is very common. As many as 20 million people are thought to have an active HPV infection at any given time, and as many as 5.5 million new cases of genital HPV infection occur in the United States each year. Most men and women — about 80 percent of sexually active people — are infected with HPV at some point in their lives, but most people never know they have the virus.
    How do you get HPV?

    Genital HPV is spread through direct skin-to-skin contact with someone who has an HPV infection. Contact includes ***inal, anal, and oral sex. Some types of HPV cause genital warts, which are hard, rough lumps that develop on the skin. Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV and genital warts.
    In women, genital warts most often appear:

    • On the vulva (the outer female genital area)
    • In or around the ***ina
    • In or around the anus
    • On the groin (where the genital area meets the inner thigh)
    • On the cervix

    What are the symptoms of HPV?

    In many cases, HPV produces no symptoms. When they do occur, the most common symptom is the presence of warts in the genital area. Signs of infection can appear weeks, months, or even years after infection with the virus.
    How is HPV diagnosed?

    There are no blood tests for HPV, but some tests can help your health care provider diagnose the infection.

    • Pap test — During this test, the health care provider removes a sample of cells from the cervix. The cells are then examined under a microscope to look for any changes in the cells, even in the absence of genital warts.
    • Colposcopy — For this test, a health care provider uses an instrument — called a colposcope — that shines a light and magnifies the view of the cervix. A vinegar solution is placed on the cervix. The solution turns abnormal cells that are infected with HPV white, so they can be more easily seen.
    • HPV DNA test — This test looks directly for the genetic material (DNA) of the HPV within a sample of cells. The test can detect the type of HPV connected to cervical cancer. The sample used for this test is generally removed at the same time as a Pap test.

    How is HPV treated?

    There is no cure for the virus itself, but many HPV infections go away on their own. In fact, about 70 percent to 90 percent of cases of HPV infection are cleared from the body by the immune system.
    The treatment goal — when treatment is needed — is to relieve symptoms by removing any visible warts and abnormal cells in the cervix. Treatments that might be used include:

    • Cryosurgery — freezing off the warts with liquid nitrogen
    • Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) — using a special wire loop to remove the abnormal cells
    • Electrocautery — burning off the warts with an electrical current
    • Laser therapy — using an intense light to destroy the warts and any abnormal cells
    • Prescription cream — applying medicated cream directly to the warts (Do not use over-the-counter wart treatments on the genital area.)

    In some cases, no treatment is needed. However, your doctor will closely monitor any cell changes during your regular screening appointments.
    Only a small number of women infected with HPV will develop cellular changes that need to be treated.
    Is HPV preventable?

    Using condoms every time you have sex can help reduce the risk of HPV. Be aware, however, that condoms do not cover all of the genital skin, so they are not 100 percent effective in protecting against the spread of HPV. A person with genital warts should not have sex until the warts are removed. This might help reduce the risk of spreading HPV.
    Women should have regular pelvic exams and Pap tests to look for abnormal changes in the cervix that might be pre-cancer. Men and women should stop having sexual contact as soon as they know or think they have genital warts, and they should seek treatment immediately.
    Get vaccinated with the new HPV vaccine. The first approved HPV vaccine, called Gardasil®, is approved for girls and women ages 9 to 26, and protects against the development of cervical cancer and genital warts. It is also approved for boys and men ages 9-26 to protect against genital warts. The second approved vaccine, called Cervarix®, is approved for women between the ages of 9-25, to protect against cervical cancer.
    It is best to get the vaccine before the start of sexual activity. The vaccine consists of a series of three shots, with shot two coming 2 months after the first, and shot three coming 6 months after the first. If you already have HPV, the vaccine does not treat or cure, but can still help protect against other types of HPV infections (other than those that cause cervical cancer; for example, the vaccine can help protect against the HPV that causes genital warts).
    How is HPV related to cervical cancer?

    Certain strains of HPV can cause changes in the cells of the cervix, a condition called cervical dysplasia. If untreated, dysplasia can progress to cervical cancer. HPV is almost always the cause of cervical cancer. However, just because a woman has HPV or cervical dysplasia does not necessarily mean she will get cervical cancer.
    Regular Pap tests are the best protection against cervical cancer. The test detects pre-cancerous changes and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is almost always preventable or cured if pre-cancerous changes are detected and treated early, before cancer develops. Before age 30, HPV infection is usually transient (resolves on its own). By age 30, detection of HPV during Pap smear screening can be used to help determine the appropriate interval for screening. The absence of high-risk HPV types indicates that a woman is at low risk for developing cervical changes related to the risk of cervical cancer. In this case, the interval of Pap test screening might be every 3-5 years. Most women will still need a yearly exam by their doctors to complete the remaining screening tests needed.
    If a woman tests positive for high-risk HPV types, her health care provider will perform yearly Pap tests to check for any cell changes that might be pre-cancerous or that need to be treated.
    Can men get HPV?

    Yes. In men, genital warts most often appear on the penis, on the scrotum, in or around the anus, or on the groin. For men, HPV infection — including those that can cause cellular changes — produce no symptoms, so diagnosing HPV in men is difficult. The diagnosis of HPV in men is made from the presence of external genital warts.
    Since there is no treatment for HPV that does not produce symptoms, most men with the infection are not treated. Sometimes, a health care provider can see small warts that might have otherwise gone unnoticed. In general, HPV infection does not place a man at a significantly higher risk for health problems. However, HPV prevention is still important for men, as the virus has been linked to uncommon cancers such as penile, anal, and head and neck.
    Glossary of terms

    Cervical dysplasia — A pre-cancerous condition that occurs when the HPV virus leads to changes in the cells of the cervix
    Cervix — The tip of the uterus, where the ***ina meets the uterus
    Genital warts — Hard, rough lumps that develop on the skin
    Groin — Where the genital area meets the inner thigh
    Vulva — The outer female genital area
    References


    • Human Papillomavirus Infection: Frequently Asked Questions. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. www.acog.org Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Society of Gynecologic Oncology. Women's Cancer Network. www.wcn.org Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Human Papillomavirus(HPV) and Genital Warts Fact Sheet. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Women’s Health. www.womenshealth.gov Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Cervical Cancer. National Cervical Cancer Coalition. www.nccc-online.org Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Understanding Cervical Changes: A Health Guide for Women. National Cancer Institute. www.cancer.gov Accessed 1/24/2012

    © Copyright 1995-2012 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. All rights reserved.

    2014 Adopt-A-Bill: Da'Norris Searcy

    Thanks to -realfan- for the beautiful tribute:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wquq4DTbC9E

    Twitter @wyobilzfan



  13. #93

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    Thoughts and prayers to the Jim Kelly and his family.

  14. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyo View Post
    http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/genital_warts/hic_understanding_hpv.aspx

    Understanding Cervical HPV


    Share on email Share on print

    What is cervical cancer?

    Cervical cancer is a condition in which the cells in the lining of the cervix — the narrow, outer end of the uterus — change and grow very fast, producing a mass of cells called a tumor. This condition usually develops over time. It can affect women of any age, but it is most common in women in their mid-40s. A type of virus, called HPV, is the cause of most cases of cervical cancer.
    What is HPV?

    HPV stands for human papilloma virus. It is a very common virus. There are about 100 types of HPV that affect different parts of the body. About 30 types of HPV can affect the genitals — including the vulva, ***ina, cervix, penis, and scrotum — as well as the rectum and anus. Of those, about 13 types are considered "high risk," for leading to cervical cancer.
    How common is HPV?

    HPV that affects the genitals is very common. As many as 20 million people are thought to have an active HPV infection at any given time, and as many as 5.5 million new cases of genital HPV infection occur in the United States each year. Most men and women — about 80 percent of sexually active people — are infected with HPV at some point in their lives, but most people never know they have the virus.
    How do you get HPV?

    Genital HPV is spread through direct skin-to-skin contact with someone who has an HPV infection. Contact includes ***inal, anal, and oral sex. Some types of HPV cause genital warts, which are hard, rough lumps that develop on the skin. Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV and genital warts.
    In women, genital warts most often appear:

    • On the vulva (the outer female genital area)
    • In or around the ***ina
    • In or around the anus
    • On the groin (where the genital area meets the inner thigh)
    • On the cervix

    What are the symptoms of HPV?

    In many cases, HPV produces no symptoms. When they do occur, the most common symptom is the presence of warts in the genital area. Signs of infection can appear weeks, months, or even years after infection with the virus.
    How is HPV diagnosed?

    There are no blood tests for HPV, but some tests can help your health care provider diagnose the infection.

    • Pap test — During this test, the health care provider removes a sample of cells from the cervix. The cells are then examined under a microscope to look for any changes in the cells, even in the absence of genital warts.
    • Colposcopy — For this test, a health care provider uses an instrument — called a colposcope — that shines a light and magnifies the view of the cervix. A vinegar solution is placed on the cervix. The solution turns abnormal cells that are infected with HPV white, so they can be more easily seen.
    • HPV DNA test — This test looks directly for the genetic material (DNA) of the HPV within a sample of cells. The test can detect the type of HPV connected to cervical cancer. The sample used for this test is generally removed at the same time as a Pap test.

    How is HPV treated?

    There is no cure for the virus itself, but many HPV infections go away on their own. In fact, about 70 percent to 90 percent of cases of HPV infection are cleared from the body by the immune system.
    The treatment goal — when treatment is needed — is to relieve symptoms by removing any visible warts and abnormal cells in the cervix. Treatments that might be used include:

    • Cryosurgery — freezing off the warts with liquid nitrogen
    • Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) — using a special wire loop to remove the abnormal cells
    • Electrocautery — burning off the warts with an electrical current
    • Laser therapy — using an intense light to destroy the warts and any abnormal cells
    • Prescription cream — applying medicated cream directly to the warts (Do not use over-the-counter wart treatments on the genital area.)

    In some cases, no treatment is needed. However, your doctor will closely monitor any cell changes during your regular screening appointments.
    Only a small number of women infected with HPV will develop cellular changes that need to be treated.
    Is HPV preventable?

    Using condoms every time you have sex can help reduce the risk of HPV. Be aware, however, that condoms do not cover all of the genital skin, so they are not 100 percent effective in protecting against the spread of HPV. A person with genital warts should not have sex until the warts are removed. This might help reduce the risk of spreading HPV.
    Women should have regular pelvic exams and Pap tests to look for abnormal changes in the cervix that might be pre-cancer. Men and women should stop having sexual contact as soon as they know or think they have genital warts, and they should seek treatment immediately.
    Get vaccinated with the new HPV vaccine. The first approved HPV vaccine, called Gardasil®, is approved for girls and women ages 9 to 26, and protects against the development of cervical cancer and genital warts. It is also approved for boys and men ages 9-26 to protect against genital warts. The second approved vaccine, called Cervarix®, is approved for women between the ages of 9-25, to protect against cervical cancer.
    It is best to get the vaccine before the start of sexual activity. The vaccine consists of a series of three shots, with shot two coming 2 months after the first, and shot three coming 6 months after the first. If you already have HPV, the vaccine does not treat or cure, but can still help protect against other types of HPV infections (other than those that cause cervical cancer; for example, the vaccine can help protect against the HPV that causes genital warts).
    How is HPV related to cervical cancer?

    Certain strains of HPV can cause changes in the cells of the cervix, a condition called cervical dysplasia. If untreated, dysplasia can progress to cervical cancer. HPV is almost always the cause of cervical cancer. However, just because a woman has HPV or cervical dysplasia does not necessarily mean she will get cervical cancer.
    Regular Pap tests are the best protection against cervical cancer. The test detects pre-cancerous changes and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is almost always preventable or cured if pre-cancerous changes are detected and treated early, before cancer develops. Before age 30, HPV infection is usually transient (resolves on its own). By age 30, detection of HPV during Pap smear screening can be used to help determine the appropriate interval for screening. The absence of high-risk HPV types indicates that a woman is at low risk for developing cervical changes related to the risk of cervical cancer. In this case, the interval of Pap test screening might be every 3-5 years. Most women will still need a yearly exam by their doctors to complete the remaining screening tests needed.
    If a woman tests positive for high-risk HPV types, her health care provider will perform yearly Pap tests to check for any cell changes that might be pre-cancerous or that need to be treated.
    Can men get HPV?

    Yes. In men, genital warts most often appear on the penis, on the scrotum, in or around the anus, or on the groin. For men, HPV infection — including those that can cause cellular changes — produce no symptoms, so diagnosing HPV in men is difficult. The diagnosis of HPV in men is made from the presence of external genital warts.
    Since there is no treatment for HPV that does not produce symptoms, most men with the infection are not treated. Sometimes, a health care provider can see small warts that might have otherwise gone unnoticed. In general, HPV infection does not place a man at a significantly higher risk for health problems. However, HPV prevention is still important for men, as the virus has been linked to uncommon cancers such as penile, anal, and head and neck.
    Glossary of terms

    Cervical dysplasia — A pre-cancerous condition that occurs when the HPV virus leads to changes in the cells of the cervix
    Cervix — The tip of the uterus, where the ***ina meets the uterus
    Genital warts — Hard, rough lumps that develop on the skin
    Groin — Where the genital area meets the inner thigh
    Vulva — The outer female genital area
    References


    • Human Papillomavirus Infection: Frequently Asked Questions. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. www.acog.org Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Society of Gynecologic Oncology. Women's Cancer Network. www.wcn.org Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Human Papillomavirus(HPV) and Genital Warts Fact Sheet. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on Women’s Health. www.womenshealth.gov Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Cervical Cancer. National Cervical Cancer Coalition. www.nccc-online.org Accessed 1/24/2012
    • Understanding Cervical Changes: A Health Guide for Women. National Cancer Institute. www.cancer.gov Accessed 1/24/2012

    © Copyright 1995-2012 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. All rights reserved.

    How is HPV treated?

    There is no cure for the virus itself, but many HPV infections go away on their own. In fact, about 70 percent to 90 percent of cases of HPV infection are cleared from the body by the immune system.
    Eat healthy and keep a strong immune system is the best way to treat this other than abstaining from sex.
    SIGNATURE
    Quote Originally Posted by muffman View Post
    Arent you the guy who said the Bills drafted EJ Manuel so they could "sell him in the americas, africa and the middle east?"
    LMAO....
    Quote Originally Posted by TAPITSB View Post
    No I said if he becomes a star he has more international AD ability than Tom Brady. I was talking about how the black athlete is marketed internationally.
    Quote Originally Posted by TAPITSB View Post
    Brady isn't Manuel and as stated the media tends to take a man like Manuel because they can sell him in all of the America's and Africa and the Middle East and not just in the United States.

  15. #95
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    Terrible news. Best wishes, Jimbo.

    Get well soon.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatSheSaid View Post
    How is HPV treated?



    Eat healthy and keep a strong immune system is the best way to treat this other than abstaining from sex.
    It's right in the body of the text you just quoted.
    2014 Adopt-A-Bill: Da'Norris Searcy

    Thanks to -realfan- for the beautiful tribute:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wquq4DTbC9E

    Twitter @wyobilzfan



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    Quote Originally Posted by John Cena View Post
    First, obviously we all wish Jim a speedy recovery, I'm still just kind of in a state of shock right now.
    His tough as nails mentality that made him who he is to all of us today will get him through this.
    If there is somebody who can beat cancer, I have to believe it's Jim Kelly.


    Secondly, cancer is anything but random...

    Just do some research into the disturbing % of Americans suffering from cancer as opposed to the rest of the world... Bad genes, sure, they can make you more susceptible, but our food supply is the main culprit.
    I'm Not trying to be snarky, just trying to raise awareness.

    Most people I speak to just say "everything gives you cancer nowadays", but it's mainly just the pesticides, highly processed & genetically modified foods, refined sugars, and alcohol abuse that's really behind it all. Plus the obvious tobacco/nicotine abuse, and as others have mentioned, HPV which i myself though was relegated to causing cancer in the female reproductive region, so add that to the list as well. All of which are not just random causes, it's just that most people aren't well informed.

    I don't know why Jim has cancer, but there's more than enough information out there to show the cancer epidemic In the United States is anything but random...

    My prayers are obviously with a Jim, and all those for that matter suffering from this ugly disease.
    oh of course. i'm someone who think that limiting the toxins we take in can help avoid sickness, but whether or not anyone wants to believe, cancer is still pretty random. children get it, people that fall in non-risk groups get it. I recently had someone I know who is 65, runs triathlons, and is the pillar of health, die of lung cancer. never once smoked. it can happen.
    "Golden teeth and golden tones, welcome to my presence"


  18. #98
    Join Date
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    Best wishes to Jim and his family.

    And thanks for the medical info, Wyo. It's good to have an expert on-board.
    R.I.P. Ball Burglar. You had a good run.

  19. #99
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    Oh man, this is just terrible news, the worst of my fears. You can beat this Jimbo, having seen both my in laws pass away from cancer I have learned one thing, I wouldn't wish it upon my most hated enemy.

  20. #100
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    Nov 2008
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    This is so sad. My thoughts and prayers are with Jim, Jill and their family....He is a tough man, he will beat this.

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